Religion

List of Christian organisations in New Zealand

Denominations and Churches

  • Seventh-day Adventist Church
  • Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia
  • ACTS Churches NZ (formerly the Apostolic Church Movement of New Zealand)
  • Roman Catholic Church in New Zealand
  • Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand
  • Methodist Church of New Zealand
  • Baptist Union of New Zealand
  • The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in New Zealand
  • Ratana
  • Ringatu
  • Assemblies of God in New Zealand
  • Associated Pentecostal Churches of New Zealand
  • Salvation Army in New Zealand
  • Christian Brethren Assemblies in New Zealand
  • Wesleyan Methodist Church in New Zealand
  • Antiochian Orthodox Archdiocese of Australia, New Zealand, and All Oceania
  • Coptic Orthodox Church in Australia and New Zealand
  • New Life Churches, New Zealand
  • Grace Presbyterian Church of New Zealand
  • Orthodox Presbyterian Church of New Zealand
  • Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australia and New Zealand
  • Reformed Churches of New Zealand
  • Anabaptist Association of Australia and New Zealand
  • Pentecostal Church of New Zealand
  • Destiny Church
  • Revival Centres International
  • City Impact Church New Zealand
  • Church of the Nazarene in New Zealand
  • LinkNZ
  • LIFE (church)
  • Lutheran Church of New Zealand
  • Elim Church New Zealand
  • Religious Society of Friends
  • Jehovah’s Witnesses

Parachurch Organisations

  • Bible Society in New Zealand
  • Church Missionary Society
  • Rhema Broadcasting Group
  • Parachute Music
  • Maxim Institute
  • Tertiary Students Christian Fellowship
  • TEAR Fund NZ
  • Scripture Union New Zealand
  • Student Life New Zealand
  • Focus on the Family New Zealand
  • World Vision New Zealand

Social Service Organisations

  • Baptist Community Ministries
  • Catholic Social Services
  • Christchurch City Mission
  • Methodist Social Services
  • New Zealand Council of Christian Social Services
  • Presbyterian Support
  • Wesley Community Action

Educational Organisations

Theological and Bible Colleges

Denominational

  • Alphacrucis (Assemblies of God)
  • Bishopdale Theological College (Anglican)
  • Booth College of Mission (Salvation Army)
  • Catholic Institute of Theology
  • Carey Baptist College
  • Equippers College (ACTS Churches NZ)
  • Good Shepherd College (Catholic)
  • Holy Cross Seminary (Catholic)
  • Holy Name Seminary (Catholic) (closed)
  • Knox Centre for Ministry and Leadership (Presbyterian)
  • Marist Seminary (Catholic)
  • Ministry Training College of New Zealand (Elim)
  • St John’s College, Auckland (Anglican)
  • St Mary’s Seminary (Catholic) (1850-1869)
  • South Pacific Bible College (Church of Christ)
  • Theology House Christchurch (Anglican)
  • Trinity Methodist Theological College
  • Vision College New Zealand (ACTS Churches NZ)

Non-denominational

  • Capernwray New Zealand
  • Ecumenical Institute of Distance Theological Studies
  • Faith Bible College
  • Grace Theological College
  • Gospel Training Trust
  • Laidlaw College
  • Lifeway College
  • New Covenant International Bible College
  • The Shepherd’s Bible College
  • World Gospel Bible College

Religious orders

  • Sisters of St Joseph of Nazareth

Primary and Secondary Schools

Catholic Church

Primary Schools

  • 190 Catholic primary schools

Secondary Schools

  • Aquinas College, Tauranga
  • Baradene College of the Sacred Heart
  • Bishop Viard College
  • Campion College, Gisborne
  • Cardinal McKeefry Catholic Primary School, Wilton, Wellington
  • Carmel College (New Zealand)
  • Catholic Cathedral College, Christchurch
  • Chanel College, Masterton
  • Cullinane College, Wanganui
  • De La Salle College, Mangere East
  • Francis Douglas Memorial College
  • Garin College, Nelson
  • Hato Paora College
  • Hato Petera College, Auckland
  • John Paul College, Rotorua
  • John Paul II High School (Greymouth)
  • Kavanagh College
  • Liston College
  • Marcellin College, Auckland
  • Marian College, Christchurch
  • Marist College, New Zealand
  • McAuley High School (New Zealand)
  • Pompallier Catholic College
  • Roncalli College
  • Rosmini College
  • Sacred Heart Cathedral School, Thorndon, Wellington
  • Sacred Heart College, Auckland
  • Sacred Heart College, Napier
  • Sacred Heart Girls’ College, Hamilton
  • Sacred Heart College, Lower Hutt
  • Sacred Heart Girls’ College, New Plymouth
  • St Bede’s College, Christchurch
  • St. Bernard’s College, Lower Hutt
  • St Catherine’s College, Wellington
  • St Dominic’s College, Henderson
  • St. John’s College, Hamilton
  • St John’s College, Hastings
  • St Joseph’s Māori Girls’ College
  • St. Kevin’s College, Oamaru
  • Saint Mary’s College Auckland
  • St Mary’s College, Wellington
  • St. Patrick’s College, Silverstream
  • St. Patrick’s College, Wellington
  • St. Paul’s College, Auckland
  • St Peter’s College, Auckland
  • St Peter’s College, Palmerston North
  • St Peter’s College, Gore
  • St Thomas of Canterbury College
  • Sancta Maria College, New Zealand
  • Verdon College
  • Villa Maria College, Christchurch

Church of England

  • Cathedral Grammar School
  • Christ’s College, Canterbury
  • Diocesan School for Girls (Auckland)
  • King’s College, Auckland
  • King’s School (Auckland)
  • Nga Tawa Diocesan School
  • Rathkeale College
  • St Mary’s Diocesan School (New Zealand)
  • St Paul’s Collegiate School
  • Samuel Marsden Collegiate School
  • Southwell School
  • St Michael’s Church School
  • Waikato Diocesan School

Methodist

  • Wesley College, Auckland

Non-denominational

  • Bethlehem College, Tauranga
  • Elim Christian College
  • Faith Academy (New Zealand)
  • Hebron Christian College, Auckland
  • Immanuel Christian School, New Zealand
  • Liberton Christian School
  • Middleton Grange School
  • Totara College of Accelerated Learning

Presbyterian

  • Columba College
  • Iona College (Havelock North)
  • John McGlashan College
  • Queen Margaret College (Wellington)
  • St. Andrew’s College (New Zealand)
  • St Cuthbert’s College, Auckland
  • Saint Kentigern College
  • Saint Oran’s College, Lower Hutt
  • Scots College, Wellington
  • Solway College

References

  1. ACTS Churches NZ Website
  2. Salvation Army NZ Website
  3. Brethren Assemblies Website
  4. Wesleyan Methodist Church NZ Website
  5. Nazarene Church Website
  6. Lutheran Church of New Zealand website
  7. http://www.baptist.org.nz/ministries/community-ministries
  8. http://www.cathsocservs.nzl.org/
  9. http://www.citymission.org.nz/
  10. http://www.methodistsocialservices.org.nz/
  11. http://www.nzccss.org.nz/site/home.php
  12. http://www.ps.org.nz/
  13. http://www.wesleyca.org.nz/
  14. http://bishopdale.ac.nz/
  15. http://salvationarmy.org.nz/explore-connect/community-hub/bcm/
  16. [1]
  17. Equippers College website
  18. [2]
  19. Holy Cross Seminary website
  20. [3]
  21. Ministry Training College website
  22. South Pacific Bible College website
  23. [4]
  24. Trinity Methodist Theological College website
  25. Vision College Website
  26. Capernwray Bible College website
  27. [5]
  28. Faith Bible College website
  29. Grace Theological College website
  30. Gospel Training Trust website
  31. Lifeway College
  32. New Covenant International Bible College website
  33. The Shepherd’s Bible College website
  34. World Gospel Bible College website

Credit: Wikipedia

February 27, 2014 / by / in
List of New Zealand Catholics

This is a list of notable New Zealand Catholics. All additions should be sourced and ideally their faith or Catholic identity should be significant to their notability.

Activists

  • Marilyn Pryor,[1][2] served on the Executive Council of what’s now called Voice for Life.

Artists and architects

  • Francis Petre, Architect of cathedrals.[3][4]

Business people

  • Charles Todd[5] Motor-industry pioneer and temperance activist. Many in the Todd family were or are Catholics.

Politicians

  • Peter Dignan,[6][7] Fifteenth Mayor of Auckland City.
  • Bill English,[8][9] Seventeenth and current Deputy Prime Minister of New Zealand.
  • Heremia Te Wake,[10] Tribal leader and catechist.
  • Joseph Ward,[11][12] Seventeenth Prime Minister of New Zealand,

Religious

Clergy

See also: List of New Zealand Catholic bishops
  • Fr. Mark Beban,[13] Also a cricketer.
  • Fr. Felix Donnelly,[14][15] A social activist, writer, academic and radio talkback host.
  • Rev. Fr. George Duggan,[16][17] Philosopher and centenarian.
  • Fr. David Kennedy,[18] Astronomer and educator.
  • Fr. Wiremu Te Awhitu,[19] First Māori to be ordained.

Religious sisters and nuns

  • Mary St Domitille Hickey,[20] Historian, school principal, and reportedly the first New Zealand woman to be awarded a doctorate in literature.
  • Mary Gonzaga Leahy,[21] Nun and hospital matron.
  • Sister Mary Leo,[22] Music educator who was a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire.
  • Marie Elizabeth Roche,[23] honored for her work in a prison.

Writers and Journalists

  • K. O. Arvidson,[24][25] Poet and academic.
  • James K. Baxter,[26] Poet and convert who was offered a job composing catechetical material for the Catholic Education Board.
  • Patrick Anthony Lawlor,[27] Writer known for the autobiographical work Old Wellington days, he also worked for the Catholic Writers’ Movement of New Zealand.
  • Michael Otto,[28] Associate editor for the NZ Catholic Newspaper.

References

  1. The Encyclopedia of New Zealand
  2. Catholic Worker New Zealand
  3. Dictionary of New Zealand Biography
  4. Francis Petre, 1847-1918 by Philippe Hamilton
  5. The Encyclopedia of New Zealand
  6. Cyclopedia Company Limited (1902). “Mr. Peter Dignan”. The Cyclopedia of New Zealand : Auckland Provincial District. Christchurch: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand. Retrieved 1 March 2012.
  7. G.W.A. Bush, Decently and In Order: The Government of the City of Auckland 1840-1971, Collins, 1971, p.521.
  8. Church has vital place in our secular society. Challenge Weekly 66 (6). 2008-02-25. Archived from the original on 2008-03-04. Retrieved 2009-10-01
  9. Colin James, Bill English conservative: a 2000s update, New Zealand Herald Weekend Review, 2 December 2006.
  10. Oliver, Steven. “Heremia Te Wake”. Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved December 2011.
  11. The Encyclopaedia of New Zealand biography
  12. Sir Joseph Ward: A Political Biography by Michael Bassett (1993, Auckland University Press)
  13. “Player profile – Mark Beban”. ESPN. Retrieved 6 January 2011.
  14. Felix Donnelly, One Priest’s Life, Australia and New Zealand Book Company, Auckland, 1982.
  15. Queen’s Birthday Honours List 1998. Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. Retrieved 4 January 2013.
  16. “Rev. Fr. George Henry Duggan SM Obituary: View George Duggan’s Obituary by The Dominion Post”. Deaths.dompost.co.nz. Retrieved 2013-01-09.
  17. Lyndsay Freer, “George Henry Duggan – the man, the myth”, Marist Messenger, 1 July 2012 (Retrieved 9 January 2012)
  18. Laracy, Hugh. “David Kennedy”. Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved December 2011.
  19. Mariu, Max T.. “Te Awhitu, Wiremu Hakopa Toa 1914 – 1994”. Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 4 April 2011.
  20. Wright, Marie Gabrielle. “Mary St Domitille Hickey”. Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved December 2011.
  21. Engel, Pauline F. “Mary Gonzaga Leahy”. Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved December 2011.
  22. The Encyclopedia of New Zealand
  23. “Nun works behind bars to improve lives of others”. stuff.co.nz. 2011. Retrieved 6 June 2011. “15 years as Rimutaka Prison’s Catholic chaplain”
  24. “Arvidson, K.O.”, Robinson and Wattie, The Oxford Companion to New Zealand Literature, Oxford, Auckland 1998, pp. 27 and 28.
  25. “K. O. Arvidson | NZETC”. nzetc.org. 2012. Retrieved 12 January 2012. “K. O. Arvidson 1938–”
  26. James Baxter biography from the Dictionary of New Zealand Biography
  27. Broughton, W. S. “Patrick Anthony Lawlor”. Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved December 2011.
  28. NZ Catholic “Our Staff” page
February 12, 2014 / by / in
List of New Zealand ministries

This article lists New Zealand ministries, which are ruling groups of Ministers in New Zealand. There are three distinctly different periods; firstly the period during the 1st New Zealand Government without responsible government, then from 1856 to 1890 the period of responsible Government, and the third period started with the formation of political parties in 1891.

Ministries are in modern usage cabinets or governments; although this definition excludes Ministers outside Cabinet (up to the introduction of MMP in 1996, most ministers were in the Cabinet).

Period without responsible Government 1854–1856

The New Zealand Constitution Act 1852 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and was the second enactment to grant the colony of New Zealand self-government. The first elections for a New Zealand House of Representatives were held during 1853, and this lower house met for the first time in 1854 in Auckland. In practice, the country was initially governed by the Governor, George Grey, with the advice of the Civil Secretary and some officials that were appointed back in 1840/41, namely Andrew Sinclair (Colonial Secretary), William Swainson (Attorney-General), and Alexander Shepherd (Colonial Treasurer).

In the first session of the 1st New Zealand Parliament, three elected member took office under the leadership of James FitzGerald, to be later joined by two members of the Legislative Council. Whilst they were the first official Executive Government under the Constitution, the practical administration remained with the Government officials. The second Ministry led by Thomas Forsaith, which briefly formed during the second session of the 1st Parliament, also had no real power.

  • Unofficial members: Fitzgerald Ministry, 1854; 14 June 1854 to 2 August 1854
  • Unofficial members: Forsaith Ministry, 1854; 31 August 1854 to 2 September 1854

Cabinet Government 1856–1890

Responsible government commenced with the third ministry, led by Henry Sewell during the term of the 2nd New Zealand Parliament:[1]

  • Sewell Ministry, 1856: 18 April 1856 to 20 May 1856
  • Fox Ministry, 1856: 20 May 1856 to 2 June 1856
  • Stafford Ministry, 1856–61: 2 June 1856 to 12 July 1861
  • Fox Ministry, 1861–62: 12 July 1861 to 6 August 1862
  • Domett Ministry, 1862–63: 6 August 1862 to 30 October 1863
  • Whitaker-Fox Ministry, 1863–64: 30 October 1863 to 24 November 1864
  • Weld Ministry, 1864–65: 24 November 1864 to 16 October 1865
  • Stafford Ministry, 1865–69: 16 October 1865 to 28 June 1869
Note that Wilson says: “Ministry was defeated on 15 August 1866 and resigned, but carried on in a caretaker capacity. However 3 Ministers resigned and were replaced. Though this was regarded as a new ministry, it was in fact a reconstruction, and is so regarded here.
  • Fox Ministry, 1869–72: 28 June 1869 to 10 September 1872
  • Stafford Ministry, 1872: 10 September 1872 to 11 October 1872
  • Waterhouse Ministry, 1872–73: 11 October 1872 to 3 March 1873
  • Fox Ministry, 1873: 3 March 1873 to 8 April 1873
  • Vogel Ministry, 1873–75: 8 April 1873 to 6 July 1875
  • Pollen Ministry, 1875–76: 6 July 1875 to 15 February 1876
  • Vogel Ministry, 1876: 15 February 1876 to 1 September 1876
  • Atkinson Ministry, 1876: 1 September 1876 to 13 September 1876 (Continuous Ministry)
  • Atkinson Ministry, 1876–77 (Reconstituted): 13 September 1876 to 13 October 1877 (Continuous Ministry)
  • Grey Ministry, 1877–79: 13 October 1877 to 8 October 1879
  • Hall Ministry, 1879–82: 8 October 1879 to 21 April 1882 (Continuous Ministry)
  • Whitaker Ministry, 1882–83: 21 April 1882 to 25 September 1883 (Continuous Ministry)
  • Atkinson Ministry, 1883–84: 25 September 1883 to 16 August 1884 (Continuous Ministry)
  • Stout-Vogel Ministry, 1884: 16 August 1884 to 28 August 1884
  • Atkinson Ministry, 1884: 28 August 1884 to 3 September 1884 (Continuous Ministry)
  • Stout-Vogel Ministry, 1884–87: 3 September 1884 to 8 October 1887
  • Atkinson Ministry, 1887–91: 8 October 1887 to 24 January 1891 (known as the Scarecrow Ministry)
Note that the Continuous Ministry is a term for the government of New Zealand from 1876 to 1890 (or 1887), except for 1877–79 and 1884–87. Sir Harry Atkinson was Premier, also Sir John Hall and Sir Frederick Whitaker. The Scarecrow Ministry of 1889–90 is sometimes included in the term.

Liberal Government of New Zealand (1891–1912)

  • Ballance Ministry, 1891-93: 24 January 1891 to 1 May 1893
  • Seddon Ministry, 1893-1906: 1 May 1893 to 21 June 1906
  • Hall-Jones Ministry, 1906: 21 June 1906 to 6 August 1906
  • Ward Ministry, 1906-1912: 6 August 1906 to 28 March 1912
  • MacKenzie Ministry, 1912: 28 March 1912 to 10 July 1912

Reform Government of New Zealand (1912–28)

  • Massey Ministry, 1912-1915: 10 July 1912 to 12 August 1915
  • National Ministry, 1915-1919: 12 August 1915 to 3 September 1919 (?)
  • Massey Ministry, 1919-1925: 4 September 1919 to 14 May 1925
  • Bell Ministry, 1925: 14 May 1925 to 30 May 1925
  • Coates Ministry, 1925-1928: 30 May 1925 to 10 December 1928

United Government of New Zealand (1928–31)

  • Ward Ministry, 1928-1930: 10 December 1928 to 28 May 1930
  • Forbes Ministry, 1930-1931: 28 May 1930 to 22 September 1931

Liberal–Reform coalition Government of New Zealand (1931–35)

  • Forbes (Coalition) Ministry, 1931-1935: 22 September 1931 to 6 December 1935

First Labour Government of New Zealand (1935–49)

  • Savage Ministry, 1935-1940: 6 December 1935 to 1 April 1940
  • Fraser Ministry, 1940-1949: 1 April 1940 to 13 December 1949
  • “War Cabinet”: 16 July 1940 to 21 August 1945
  • “War Administration”: 30 June 1942 to 2 October 1945
Note: The War Cabinet was responsible for all decisions related to war matters. The War Administration was charged with the responsibility for all matters connected with the war and with New Zealand’s war effort. The War Cabinet acted as its executive body. Both included opposition members.
Note: Wood has three Fraser Ministries: 1 April 1940 to 29 October 1943; 29 October 1943 to 19 December 1946; 19 December 1946 to 13 December 1949.

First National Government of New Zealand (1949–57)

  • Holland (First) Ministry: 1949-1954: 13 December 1949 to 26 November 1954
  • Holland (Second) Ministry: 1954-1957: 26 November 1954 to 20 September 1957
  • Holyoake (First) Ministry: 1957: 20 September 1957 to 12 December 1957

Second Labour Government of New Zealand (1957–60)

  • Nash Ministry: 1957-1960: 12 December 1957 to 12 December 1960

Second National Government of New Zealand (1960–72)

  • Holyoake (Second) Ministry: 1960-1972: 12 December 1960 to 7 February 1972
  • Marshall Ministry: 1972: 7 February 1972 to 8 December 1972

Third Labour Government of New Zealand (1972–75)

  • Kirk Ministry: 1972-1974: 8 December 1972 to 10 September 1974
  • Rowling Ministry, 1974-1975: 6 September 1974 to 12 December 1975
Note: while Rowling was sworn in on 6 September, his ministers were not sworn in until 10 September

Third National Government of New Zealand (1975–84)

  • Muldoon Ministry, 1975-1984: 12 December 1975 to 26 July 1984

Note: Wood has three Muldoon Ministries: 12 December 1975 to 13 December 1978; 13 December 1978 to 11 December 1981; 11 December 1981 to 26 July 1984

Fourth Labour Government of New Zealand (1984–90)

  • Lange Ministry: from 26 July 1984 to 24 August 1987
  • Lange Ministry: from 24 August 1987 to 4 August 1989
  • Palmer/Moore Ministry: from 14 August 1989 to 2 November 1990

Note: On 4 September 1990 Mike Moore succeeded Geoffrey Palmer as Prime Minister. Wood has a gap between the Lange Ministry and the Palmer/Moore Ministry from 4 to 14 August 1989.

Fourth National Government of New Zealand (1990–99)

  • Bolger Ministry: from 2 November 1990 to 29 November 1993
  • Bolger Ministry: from 29 November 1993 to 16 December 1996
  • Bolger Ministry: from 16 December 1996 to 1997
  • Shipley Ministry: from 1997 to 10 December 1999

Fifth Labour Government of New Zealand (1999–2008)

  • Clark Ministry: from 10 December 1999.

Fifth National Government of New Zealand (2008 – present)

  • Key Ministry: from 19 November 2008
  • Credit: Wikipedia
February 12, 2014 / by / in
New Zealand religious leaders

The following is a list of New Zealand people who are known best for their role in organised religion.

  • Brian Patrick Ashby (1923–1988), Fifth Catholic bishop of Christchurch (1964–1985)
  • Alfred Walter Averill – Anglican Archbishop of New Zealand 1925-1940
  • Leonard Anthony Boyle (born 30 November 1930) – Emeritus Catholic Bishop of Dunedin, Fifth Bishop of that see (1983–2005).
  • Matthew Joseph Brodie (1864–1943), Second Catholic Bishop of Christchurch (1915–1943), first New Zealander by birth to be made a Catholic bishop.
  • Denis George Browne – Third Catholic Bishop of Cook Island and Niue (1977–1983); Tenth Catholic Bishop of Auckland (1983–1994); Second Catholic Bishop of Hamilton (1995–present)
  • Colin David Campbell (born 21 September 1941) – Sixth Catholic Bishop of Dunedin (2004-).
  • Henry William Cleary – Sixth Catholic Bishop of Auckland (1910–1929).
  • Thomas William Croke – Second Catholic Bishop of Auckland (1870–1874)
  • Peter Cullinane (born 1936), First Catholic Bishop of Palmerston North (1980-2012).
  • John Jerome Cunneen (1932–2010), Eighth Catholic Bishop of the Christchurch (1995–2007).
  • Brian Davis – Anglican Archbishop of New Zealand 1985 – 1997
  • Reginald John Delargey – Cardinal, Eighth Catholic Bishop of Auckland (1970–1974); Fourth Catholic Archbishop of Wellington and Metropolitan of New Zealand (1974–1978)
  • John Atcherley Dew – Sixth Catholic Archbishop of Wellington and Metropolitan of New Zealand (2005–present)
  • Owen John Dolan (born 1928), Catholic Coadjutor Bishop Emeritus of Palmerston North, Coadjutor Bishop of Palmerston North (1995–2004)
  • Paul Donoghue SM (born 18 January 1949), Sixth Catholic Bishop of Rarotonga (2011–present)
  • Charles Drennan (born 1960) Second Bishop of Palmerston North (2012–present)
  • Patrick James Dunn – Eleventh Catholic Bishop of Auckland, New Zealand (1995–present)
  • Wallace Fard Muhammad – (disputed) Born as Wallace Dodd Ford, a New Zealand national, founder of Nation of Islam.
  • Edward Russell Gaines – First Catholic Bishop of Hamilton (1980–1994)
  • Lloyd Geering – theologian
  • John Joseph Grimes (1842–1915) – First Catholic bishop of Christchurch (1887–1915)
  • Octavius Hadfield – Anglican Primate 1890 – 1893
  • Denis William Hanrahan (1933–1987), Sixth Catholic Bishop of Christchurch, New Zealand (1985–1987).
  • Allen Howard Johnston – Anglican Primate of New Zealand
  • Barry Philip Jones (born 1941), Ninth Catholic Bishop of Christchurch (2007–present)
  • Edward Michael Joyce (1904–1964), Fourth Catholic bishop of Christchurch (1950–1964).
  • John Patrick Kavanagh (1913–1985), Fourth Catholic Bishop of Dunedin (1949–1985).
  • Mazhar Krasniqi – First President of the Federation of Islamic Associations of New Zealand
  • Robin Walsh Leamy SM (born 1935), Catholic Bishop of Rarotonga, Cook Islands and Niue (1984–1996), Auxiliary Bishop of Auckland (1996–present).
  • George Michael Lenihan OSB – Fifth Catholic Bishop of Auckland (1896–1910).
  • James Michael Liston – Archbishop; Seventh Catholic Bishop of Auckland (1929-19700
  • John Edmund Luck OSB – Fourth Catholic Bishop of Auckland (1882–1896)
  • Patrick James Lyons (1903–1967) – Third Catholic Bishop of Christchurch (1944–1950), Auxiliary Bishop of Sydney (1950–1957) and fourth Bishop of Bishop of Sale(1957–1967).
  • Peter Thomas Bertram McKeefry – Cardinal; Third Catholic Archbishop of Wellington and Metropolitan of New Zealand (1954–1973)
  • Max Takuira Matthew Mariu SM (1952–2005), Auxiliary Bishop of Hamilton (1988–2005)
  • John Mackey – Eighth Catholic Bishop of Auckland (1974–1983)
  • John Basil Meeking (born 1929, Bishop Emeritus of Christchurch (1995-) 7th Catholic Bishop of Christcchurch 1987-1995).
  • Patrick Moran – First Catholic Bishop of Dunedin
  • David Moxon – Anglican Bishop of Waikato
  • Samuel Tarratt Nevill – First Anglican Bishop of Dunedin
  • Stuart France O’Connell SM (born 1935), Fifth Catholic Bishop of Rarotonga (1996 – )
  • Hugh John O’Neill – Catholic Coadjutor Bishop of Dunedin (1943–1946)
  • Thomas O’Shea – Second Catholic Archbishop of Wellington and Metropolitan of New Zealand (1935–1954)
  • Jean Baptiste Pompallier – First Catholic Bishop of Auckland (1838–1870)
  • Francis William Mary Redwood – First Catholic Archbishop of Wellington and Metropolitan of New Zealand (1875–1935)
  • Paul Reeves – Anglican Archbishop and Governor-General
  • John Hubert Macey Rodgers SM (1915–1997), Vicar Apostolic of Tonga (1953–1957), Vicar Apostolic of Tonga and Niue (1957–1966), Bishop of Tonga (1966–1973),Bishop of Rarotonga (1973–1977), Auxiliary Bishop of Auckland (1977–1985), Superior of the Mission, Funafuti, Tuvalu (1986).
  • George Augustus Selwyn – first Anglican Primate of New Zealand
  • Owen Noel Snedden (1962–1981), Catholic Auxiliary Bishop of Wellington (1962–1981)
  • Walter Steins SJ – Archbishop; Third Catholic Bishop of Auckland (1879–1881)
  • Brian Tamaki – founder of Destiny Church
  • William Brown Turei – Anglican Bishop of Aotearoa
  • Whakahuihui Vercoe – Anglican Primate of New Zealand 2004-2006
  • Michael Verdon (1838–1918) – Second Catholic Bishop of Dunedin (1896–1918).
  • Philippe-Joseph Viard SM – Vicar Apostolic/Administrator Apostolic of Wellington (1848–1860); First Catholic Bishop of Wellington (1860–1872)
  • Thomas Stafford Williams – Cardinal, Fifth Catholic Archbishop of Wellington and Metropolitan of New Zealand (1979–2005)
  • James Whyte – Third Catholic Bishop of Dunedin, New Zealand (1920–1957).
February 11, 2014 / by / in
New Zealand Catholic bishops

The following is a list of Catholic Bishops in New Zealand.

  • Brian Patrick Ashby (1923-1988), Fifth Bishop of Christchurch (1964-1985)
  • Leonard Anthony Boyle (born 30 November 1930) – Fifth Bishop of Dunedin (1983–2005).
  • Matthew Joseph Brodie (1864–1943), Second Bishop of Christchurch (1915–1943), first New Zealander by birth to be made a Catholic bishop.
  • Denis George Browne (born 1937) – Third Bishop of Cook Islands and Niue (1977–1983); Tenth Bishop of Auckland (1983–1994); Second Bishop of Hamilton (1995–present)
  • Colin David Campbell (born 21 September 1941) – Sixth Bishop of Dunedin (2004-present).
  • Henry William Cleary (1859-1929) – Sixth Bishop of Auckland (1910–1929).
  • Thomas William Croke (1824-1902) – Second Bishop of Auckland (1870–1874)
  • Peter Cullinane (born 1936), First Bishop of Palmerston North (1980-2012).
  • John Jerome Cunneen (1932-2010) – Eighth Bishop of the Christchurch (1995-2007).
  • Reginald John Delargey (1914-1979) – Cardinal, Eighth Bishop of Auckland (1970–1974); Fourth Archbishop of Wellington and Metropolitan of New Zealand (1974–1978)
  • John Atcherley Dew (born 1948) – Sixth Archbishop of Wellington and Metropolitan of New Zealand (2005–present)
  • Owen John Dolan (born 1928), Coadjutor Bishop of Palmerston North (1995-2004)
  • Paul Donoghue SM (born 18 January 1949), Sixth Bishop of Rarotonga (2011 – present)
  • Charles Edward Drennan (born 1960) Second Bishop of Palmerston North (2012-present)
  • Patrick James Dunn (born 1950) – Eleventh Bishop of Auckland (1995–present)
  • Edward Russell Gaines (1926-1994) – First Bishop of Hamilton (1980–1994)
  • John Joseph Grimes (1842–1915) – First Bishop of Christchurch (1887–1915)
  • Denis William Hanrahan (1933-1987), Sixth Bishop of Christchurch (1985-1987).
  • Barry Philip Jones (born 1941), Ninth Bishop of Christchurch (2007-present)
  • Edward Michael Joyce (1904-1964), Fourth Bishop of Christchurch (1950-1964)
  • John Patrick Kavanagh (1913–1985), Fourth Bishop of Dunedin (1949–1985).
  • Robin Walsh Leamy SM (born 1934), Fourth Bishop of Rarotonga, Cook Islands and Niue (1984-1996), Auxiliary Bishop of Auckland (1996-present).
  • George Michael Lenihan OSB (1858-1910) – Fifth Bishop of Auckland (1896–1910).
  • James Michael Liston (1881-1976) – Coadjutor Bishop of Auckland (1921-1929); Seventh Bishop of Auckland (1929–1970) (with title of Archbishop).
  • John Edmund Luck OSB (1840-1896)- Fourth Bishop of Auckland (1882–1896)
  • Patrick James Lyons (1903–1967) – Third Bishop of Christchurch (1944–1950), Auxiliary Bishop of Sydney (1950–1957) and fourth Bishop of Sale (1957–1967).
  • John Mackey (born 1918) – Eighth Bishop of Auckland (1974–1983)
  • Max Takuira Matthew Mariu SM (1952-2005), Auxiliary Bishop of Hamilton (1988-2005)
  • Peter Thomas Bertram McKeefry (1899-1973) – Cardinal; Third Archbishop of Wellington and Metropolitan of New Zealand (1954–1973)
  • John Basil Meeking (born 1929, Seventh Bishop of Christchurch (1987-1995).
  • Patrick Moran (1823-1895) – First Bishop of Dunedin
  • Stuart France O’Connell SM (born 1935), Fifth Bishop of Rarotonga (1996-2011 )
  • Hugh John O’Neill (1898-1955) – Coadjutor Bishop Dunedin (1943–1946)
  • Thomas O’Shea (1870-1954) – Second Archbishop of Wellington and Metropolitan of New Zealand (1935–1954)
  • Jean Baptiste Pompallier (1802-1871) – Vicar Apostolic of Western Oceania (1836-1842); Vicar Apostolic of New Zealand (1842-1848); First Bishop of Auckland (1848-1869)
  • Francis William Mary Redwood (1839-1935) SM – Second Catholic Bishop of Wellington (1875-1887); First Archbishop of Wellington and Metropolitan of New Zealand(1887–1935)
  • John Hubert Macey Rodgers SM (1915-1997), Vicar Apostolic of Tonga (1953-1957), Vicar Apostolic of Tonga and Niue (1957-1966), First Bishop of Tonga (1966-1973), Second Bishop of Rarotonga (1973-1977), Auxiliary Bishop of Auckland (1977-1985), Superior of the Mission, Funafuti, Tuvalu (1986).
  • Owen Noel Snedden(1962-1981), Auxiliary Bishop of Wellington (1962-1981).
  • Walter Steins SJ (1810-1881) – Third Bishop of Auckland (1879–1881) (with title of Archbishop)
  • Michael Verdon (1838–1918) – Second Bishop of Dunedin (1896–1918).
  • Philippe-Joseph Viard SM (1809-1872) – Vicar Apostolic/Administrator Apostolic of Wellington (1848–1860); First Bishop of Wellington (1860–1872)
  • Thomas Stafford Williams (born 1930) – Cardinal, Fifth Archbishop of Wellington and Metropolitan of New Zealand (1979–2005)
  • James Whyte (1868-1957) – Third Bishop of Dunedin, New Zealand (1920–1957).
February 11, 2014 / by / in